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Fall Incense Recipe


Great Fall Incense recipe for you!

  • 1 Part Frankincense Resin
  • 1/2 Part Myrrh Resin

    fall-leaves

    Fall Leaves

  • 1 Part White Copal Resin
  • 3 Fall Colored leaves, dried and pulverized
  • 3 Tbs. dried cedar leaves, chopped small

Mix together and burn on charcoal tabs

 

Flowers in My Garden


I don’t feel like writing a poem,

Instead, I will light the incense-burning vessel

Filled with myrrh, jasmine and frankincense,

And the poem will grow in my heart

Like flowers in my garden.

~According to a student of Hafis (15th century A.D.)

Violet and Company took about a year off, maybe a little more, while I remade our webstore.  Now it is finished and the happy time of writing on the blog is back.  This week we will start a series looking at frankincense, one of my favorite resins.

Here is a fun frankincense fact-during the times of the Pharaohs, the ancient Greeks and the Romans, most people didn’t know where frankincense and myrrh came from.  Many stories floated around such as they were guarded by winged serpents.  These things were held in secret in order to allow the countries where the frankincense and myrrh trees grew to have a monopoly on the market, making the resin trade very lucrative for them.

Photo of Ethiopian Frankincense tears

Ethiopian Frankincense  at Violet and Company

 

Rizzi-Fischer, Susanne (1998) The Complete Incense Book. Sterling Publishing, New York.

Photo by Violet and Company Incense

Amber Resin on sale!


Amber Resin on sale this week, $3.50

This Amber resin is a rich, dark color and the smell is incredible.  We did an experiment this week and put some of this amber in an aroma lamp with water and it smelled great!  Also wears well on skin and burns great on charcoal.

Dark Golden Amber Resin

Dark Golden Amber Resin

Lemongrass Essential Oil and Joy


Today athletes use all sorts of things to get better in their sport, for example vitamins or special machines to measure oxygen content in the blood.  We use drugs to take away our depression, we take medicine to lower our blood pressure.  What about using our sense of smell?

Our sense of smell is one vehicle that is available to us to use to influence our bodies and our mood and enhance our performance.  Our brains are wired for smell.  Smell is one of the most powerful senses that we have. Scent has been used for centuries to enhance performance, sharpen the mind and  focus the energy.

Try sandalwood to focus the mind and calm.  Try rose to open the heart and bring a loving atmosphere. Try lemongrass for joy and energy today!  Auroshikha makes a great essential oil of lemongrass-just a few drops in a diffuser does wonders!

Photo by Martin Talbot

Photo by Martin Talbot

Joy


Joy comes in many shapes and sizes every day.  Sometimes it is just a delight in seeing a friend or hearing favorite music.  Whatever brings you joy, do it and do it often.  When you are happy and joyful, others are more inclined to be so too!  Joy is a gift you give to yourself and to others around you…

Scent helps to bring joy and change perspective.  Try taking an incense break or smelling a favorite perfume or essential oil.  Keep a little bit of resin in your desk at work or your car and do some scent therapy whenever needed.  It can really make a difference in your day!

Photo of joyful boy

Photo by Vinoth Chandar

Enjoy 10% off every order until Black Friday


Don’t forget to get your incense and candles at 10% off by shopping at Violet and Company before Black Friday!  Low shipping and 10% off means big savings on your Nag Champa, India Temple incense, Dragon’s Blood resin and anything else you have been meaning to get!

Burning Incense courtesy of WikiCommons

What are the Different Forms of Incense-Part 2


 

Cone, Resin and Powder

Incense can be found in many forms.  It is most often seen as sticks or cones.  Last blog we talked about stick and coil incense.  This time I’d like to address cone, resin and powder incense.

Cone Incense: Cone incense is one of the most common forms of incense in the Western world. Cone incense is made of the same things that stick incense is made of: ground woods, gums, resins, herbs and aromatic oils. There is also a combustion agent added. Some use saltpeter, some use charcoal. Others use a natural substance called Makko, which comes from a tree. Because there is no wood core in cone incense, the chemical make up is a bit different than the stick incense, and there is no wood to mingle with the stick. For this reason, the smell of cone incense can be slightly different than the stick. If you are used to a stick incense and would like to try the same aroma in a cone form, be aware it may not be exactly the same experience you are used to.

Resin Incense: Resin incense is hardened sap from trees, bushes, shrubs.
It is one of the oldest and most natural forms of incense.  Resin incense is what is called a “non-combustible” incense, meaning that you must put it on something that is burning in order for it to burn and release its aroma.  Frankincense resin, Myrrh resin, Ylang Ylang as well as Rose resin all come from trees, shrubs and bushes.  Resin is very hard and can be broken up to burn smaller pieces.  Resins are not only used in meditation, resins are used by some in rituals.  Different resins can have different meanings or purposes depending on which ritual is being performed.

image

powdered incense photo courtesy of Modern Dryad incense

Powder Incense: Powder incenses are simply either resins or incense materials such as roots, bark, flowers, etc. that have been ground into a powder (for example sandalwood powder).  Some, such as the sandalwood powder and the many incense powders at Modern Dryad Incense, are also non-combustible and must be burnt on charcoal or another burning medium, such as Makko (see above).

There are some self-igniting incense powders that are pre-prepared.  These include powders such as the Medicine Buddha Incense Powder, Dragon’s Blood and Come Hither Powder.  Violet and Company doesn’t carry these, but you can find them on the internet.  We at Violet and Company would recommend visiting Modern Dryad Incense to try some of their cones and powders.

This blog is by no means exhaustive and there is much more to be explained about the complex and ancient forms of incense.  Hopefully, this is just a start and you will be able to learn more in the future.

Sandalwood


Sandalwood.  It is a basic scent that most people know, even if they can’t put their finger on the exact scent.  Sandalwood is in many things from incense, to cosmetics to perfume.  Sandalwood inspires unity with the Divine, imposes a masculinity, blends well with other scents such as Patchouli or Rose and is a base scent for many incenses.  It provides a solid wood base note that many other scents can climb up and ring off of.  Many things can be said about sandalwood and it is a favorite scent here at Violet and Company.

Sandalwood is a type of tree from the genus Santalum.  Popular sandalwood trees are Indian sandalwood and Australian sandalwood.  Sandalwood is called Chandan in India, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka.

Precious Chandan by HEM is a wonderful Indian sandalwood fragrance-very sweet.  You can find it at Violet and Company by clicking on the link above.  Sandalwood  is known as Koh in Japanese.  Mainichikoh is a favorite sandalwood incense by Nippon Kodo-very woody and spicy.  Mainichikoh is a beautiful Japanese incense; the fragrance is perfectly placed with authentic oils and woods used to really capture the woody, hearty aroma of sandalwood.

sandalwood tree in Australia courtesy of waratahsoftware.com.au

Sandalwood plays large parts in the great religions of the world.  Buddhism and Hinduism use sandalwood extensively.  Neo-pagans also use sandalwood in rituals and meditation.  Sandalwood resins are rubbed on the skin to scent the body or burnt on charcoal as a pure form of sandalwood incense.  Sandalwood oil is used in Ayurvedic medicine to treat mental health issues and by others to beautify skin.  As always, if the oil is to be used, it should only be advised and controlled by someone educated in the uses of essential oils, as essential oils are potent distillations of plant matter and are very concentrated.

Violet and Company has the sandalwood for you-whether it is Mainichikoh, Yoga Sandalwood, Precious Chandan, Sandalwood resins, Suvarna Dhara or Mysore Sandalwood.  If you don’t find what you want on the website, just email us at sales@violetandcompany.com and we will find what you want.

References:  Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandalwood#Fragrance

Myrrh


Myrrh is another wonderful resin that has been brought forward from ancient times for use in the modern world.  It is said that at one time Myrrh was as valuable as gold.  It was used for medicinal purposes, for incense and for perfume.

Myrrh is a resin derived from cutting the bark of the trees in the Commiphora species, commonly found in Northern Africa.  The resin “bleeds” from the tree bark and quickly hardens into a glossy, light colored, firm lump.  The more the resin is aged, the darker it becomes. 

myrrh resin chunks Myrrh Resin

Myrrh was used by the Ancient Egyptians in the embalming process.  It is used today by everyone from the Roman Catholics to the Neo-Pagans for religious purposes. 

Studies done on possible medicinal uses of Myrrh, show that Myrrh produces an analgesic effect on mice.  Myrrh is used in Chinese medicine as well as in herbal medicine.  If you are going to ingest Myrrh, be sure that you know its source and that it is derived using pure means.

You can find Myrrh resin for burning on charcoal discs or for rubbing on your body at Violet and Company.  Another wonderful way to use Myrrh is to crush the resin with a mortar and pestle and dissolve it into a vial of carrier oil such as apricot oil and then wear it as a perfume oil.  Delicious.

References:  Wikipedia Myrrh

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