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myrrh

This tag is associated with 4 posts

Fall Incense Recipe


Great Fall Incense recipe for you!

  • 1 Part Frankincense Resin
  • 1/2 Part Myrrh Resin

    fall-leaves

    Fall Leaves

  • 1 Part White Copal Resin
  • 3 Fall Colored leaves, dried and pulverized
  • 3 Tbs. dried cedar leaves, chopped small

Mix together and burn on charcoal tabs

 

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King David’s Temptation


Taken from Susanne Fischer-Rizzi’s The Complete Incense Book, here is an ancient recipe for making your own incense to tempt and enthrall the object of your affection just for Valentine’s Day.  It made King David of Israel irresistible and may do the same for you!  According to Fischer-Rizzi, King David used to suspend his clothing in the smoke and allow the fragrance to fill a room.  The fragrance is warm and sensual.

KING DAVID’S TEMPTATION

4 parts Myrrh resin (see pic below) &  1/2 part Agar wood
1 part Cinnamon Bark (powder)
1 part Sandalwood (powder)

Crush the agar wood, then the myrrh with a mortar and pestle.  Add the Sandalwood and the cinnamon.  Place a pinch at a time on hot charcoal.  Enjoy.

Myrrh Resin Chunks

Myrrh Resin Chunks

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Kyara Deluxe Incense by Nippon Kodo

Myrrh


Myrrh is another wonderful resin that has been brought forward from ancient times for use in the modern world.  It is said that at one time Myrrh was as valuable as gold.  It was used for medicinal purposes, for incense and for perfume.

Myrrh is a resin derived from cutting the bark of the trees in the Commiphora species, commonly found in Northern Africa.  The resin “bleeds” from the tree bark and quickly hardens into a glossy, light colored, firm lump.  The more the resin is aged, the darker it becomes. 

myrrh resin chunks Myrrh Resin

Myrrh was used by the Ancient Egyptians in the embalming process.  It is used today by everyone from the Roman Catholics to the Neo-Pagans for religious purposes. 

Studies done on possible medicinal uses of Myrrh, show that Myrrh produces an analgesic effect on mice.  Myrrh is used in Chinese medicine as well as in herbal medicine.  If you are going to ingest Myrrh, be sure that you know its source and that it is derived using pure means.

You can find Myrrh resin for burning on charcoal discs or for rubbing on your body at Violet and Company.  Another wonderful way to use Myrrh is to crush the resin with a mortar and pestle and dissolve it into a vial of carrier oil such as apricot oil and then wear it as a perfume oil.  Delicious.

References:  Wikipedia Myrrh

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